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Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Vesak Day Long Weekend to Kuantan Wreck - MV DiveRACE [27th to 30th May 2010]

Hello Divers!!


We are heading to Kuantan Wreck! Enjoy a different dive site on board MV DiveRACE as we explore further north of the east coast of Malaysia. Limited spaces for this long weekend trip! 3D3N on board MV DiveRACE!

Nichi Asu Maru (Kuantan Wreck) is a Japanese coastal tanker, carrying crude oil sunk in the 1960's, now sitting on her port side at 26m of waters. The 80 metre long wreck is still in good condition with the propeller. Large rays are common, as are smaller creatures like cowries, mantis shrimps and nudibranchs.

Trip package includes:

- 16 meals (light breakfast, main breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner) with BBQ dinner
- 9 dives
- weights / weight belt / tanks


Pricing:

Master Cabin (quad share / ensuite) - 920 SGD per pax
Deluxe Cabin (twin share / ensuite) - 950 SGD per pax
Standard Cabin (twin share) - 890 SGD per pax

Special offer for this trip:

10% discount for Nitrox or Advance Course on board
20% discount for Nitrox fills
50% discount for equipment rental
50% discount for DiveRACE drifit T-shirt

* only for direct booking with DiveRACE Pte Ltd


Book with us online NOW! Limited Spaces only.

Visit the Trip Schedule page now! http://www.diverace.com/TripScheduling.aspx




Thank you!




Lionel

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Fin Pivot - Tips and Tricks


Fin Pivot is the first buoyancy skill that a student diver would learn and experience. It builds the solid foundation of scuba diving as every diver would know that buoyancy is the most important skill that a diver need to have to enjoy diving. Thus, divers should not neglect this skill!

This skill will help diver to learn how to control their breath and the amount of air to input into their BCD so as to achieve neutral buoyancy. 

When to use this skill:
- when a diver want to take a photo on a relatively flat surface, fin pivot helps to have a point of support
- when stopping to observe something or waiting at a shallow depth, so as not to be affected by the swells

Some points and preparation

Divers should practice regulator to snorkel exchange at the shallow end - this helps to coordinate the clearing regulator techniques and prevent panic when doing fin pivot.

Patience is key to this skill as buoyancy takes time to work - buoyancy do not work immediately after you inhale or exhale. It takes awhile for your expanded or collapsed lung to work, so be patient!

Divers should not be over-weighted as it would mean that more air / breath is required to achieve neutral buoyancy.

Visualisation [whereby you close your eyes and mentally going through the things / steps that you are suppose to do - as though you are looking through your own eyes and not from a third party perspective] helps tremendously!


Fin Pivot - Power inflator method

Step 1: Deflate BCD fully and lie flat on the ground, facing down. Equalise your ears as this skill should be done at the deep end of the pool. Hold the power inflator mechanism in your hand, with the thumb on the inflate button. 

Step 2: Lock your knees and straighten your body. Hands position in front of you, with the fore arm one on top of the other. (this would help to prevent using of hands to push off) - imagine a genie's hand position when coming out of the lamp.

Step 3: Breath in and out (at least 70% to 80% of your lungs filled - considering a normal breath to be 50%) while lying face down. 

*note: if the diver is correctly weighted, there is no need to inflate the BCD as the inflated lungs would be able help the diver achieve neutral buoyancy
*note: DO NOT hold your breath! breathe in and out SLOWLY!

Step 4: if nothing happens after breathing according to step 3, inflate your BCD slightly by pressing the inflate button once. wait for 5 secs and breath according to step 3.

*note: DO NOT press and hold the inflate button as too much air would inflate your BCD and cause the diver to be over positively buoyant.
*note: If diver ascends to the surface (overly positive), deflate the BCD completely and restart from beginning

Step 5: once neutrally buoyant and knees locked, the diver would pivot at the fin tips. When breathing in, the lung expands, and the diver will ascend slightly. When breathing out, the lung collapse, and the diver will descend slightly.

*note: Diver's body position should be at least 20 to 30 cm above the ground and fin tips should always touch the ground.



Fin Pivot - Oral infation method

Step 1: Deflate BCD fully and lie flat on the ground, facing down. Equalise your ears as this skill should be done at the deep end of the pool. Hold the power inflator mechanism in your hand, with the fingers on the DEFLATE button and your palm covering the hole of the power inflator mechanism.

*note: different models of power inflator mechanism will have different means to cover the hole (or of there is one in the first place)

Step 2: Lock your knees and straighten your body. Hands position in front of you, with the fore arm one on top of the other. (this would help to prevent using of hands to push off) - imagine a genie's hand position when coming out of the lamp.

Step 3: Breath in and out (at least 70% to 80% of your lungs filled - considering a normal breath to be 50%) while lying face down. 

*note: if the diver is correctly weighted, there is no need to inflate the BCD as the inflated lungs would be able help the diver achieve neutral buoyancy
*note: DO NOT hold your breath! breathe in and out SLOWLY!

Step 4: if nothing happens after breathing according to step 3, inflate your BCD slightly by orally inflating the BCD and clear your regulator after putting it back into your mouth but before you take a breath in. wait for 5 secs and breath according to step 3.

*note: DO NOT breathe in too much air into your BCD as you will become overly positive. Give a slight breath and remember to always bubble out when the regulator is not in your mouth.
*note: If diver ascends to the surface (overly positive), deflate the BCD completely and restart from beginning

Step 5: once neutrally buoyant and knees locked, the diver would pivot at the fin tips. When breathing in, the lung expands, and the diver will ascend slightly. When breathing out, the lung collapse, and the diver will descend slightly.

*note: Diver's body position should be at least 20 to 30 cm above the ground and fin tips should always touch the ground.


Below is the video to show you a visual image of the Fin Pivot Skill!




Common Mistakes

1. Over-inflating resulting in positive buoyancy and ascent to surface.

Remedy: DO NOT press the inflate button too long as too much air will be put into your BCD. Also, DO NOT orally inflate too much. patience is the key to this skill as it takes time for buoyancy to happen. Many student divers may be impatient that instead of giving time, they inflate the BCD once more and thus over inflate.

2. Oral inflation - bubbles escape into the water instead of into the BCD.

Remedy: it is either the deflate button is not properly pressed or the diver did not cover the hole of the power inflator mechanism. It is important to practice orally inflating your BCD on land so that you understand what is involved when you are performing the skill underwater.

3. Knees are bent and thus diver is pivot at the knee caps and instead of the fin tips.

Remedy: Lock your knees and stiffen your body! spread your feet slightly wider than your shoulder width so as to achieve more stability when performing the skill.


Remember that buoyancy control is really important for any diver to enjoy their dives and fin pivot is the first thing that divers can learn to practice controlling their buoyancy. It takes a few dives to fully practice and master the buoyancy control. Thus, please do not feel down and give up easily when you find it tough to control your buoyancy. 

Buoyancy is a topic which there are many many points to note and work on. But we shall leave it to next time!


Hope everyone enjoyed the read on fin pivot! =)


Dive Safe,


Lionel






Saturday, February 20, 2010

Did you know...? [Mantis Shrimp]

Mantis shrimp [Lysiosquilla scabricauda] are marine crustaceans and are classified into 2 types, Spearers and Smashers. Found mainly in shallow (10m to 40m) tropical and subtropical regions, they have a variety of colors (dull to multi-colored) and sizes.


Spearers are armed with spiny appendages topped with barbed tips, used to stab and snag prey. Below is a picture of the Giant Spearing Mantis Shrimp found in Similan Islands, Phuket.

Smashers, on the other hand, possess a much more developed club and a more rudimentary spear (which is nevertheless still quite sharp and used in fights between their own kind); the club is used to bludgeon and smash their meals apart. Below is a picture of the Peacock Mantis Shrimp, found in Richelieu Rock, Phuket.

For smashers, the claws are employed with blinding quickness, with an acceleration of 10,400 g and speeds of 23 m/s from a standing start, about the acceleration of a .22 calibre bullet!! Because they strike so rapidly, they generate cavitation bubbles between the appendage and the striking surface. The prey is hit twice by a single strike; first by the claw and then by the collapsing cavitation bubbles that immediately follow!

Did you know? 
That the pistol shrimp also uses a similar technique to stun its prey - by snapping its claws at such speed that it sends a shockwave!!


Behavior

Mantis Shrimp love burrows and crevices, which they inhibit. Not often seen exposed fully in the open water, they scurry quickly across the terrain or, at times, stay really still to observe their surroundings.


Mantis shrimp appear to be highly intelligent. They are live for long periods of time and exhibit complex behaviour, such as ritualised fighting. Some species use fluorescent patterns on their bodies for communicating with their own and other species. They can learn and remember well, and are able to recognise individual neighbours with whom they frequently interact via visual signs and smell. Many have developed complex social behaviour to defend their space from rivals.

Perhaps most interestingly, mantis shrimp have an aggressive nature and hunt with lightning quick reflexes (as shown in the video below).


Did you know?
That the mantis shrimp are able to see a wide range of colors as they have 16 different photoreceptor types (even more than a human who has only 4 receptors!!). Their eyes are even able to sense the size of the tide and are said to be the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom!

Mating

During mating rituals, mantis shrimp actively fluoresce, and the wavelength of this fluorescence matches the wavelengths detected by their eye pigments. Females are only fertile during certain phases of the tidal cycle; the ability to perceive the phase of the moon via their eyes may therefore help prevent wasted mating efforts. 


Most mantis shrimp live alone, but males and females will come together briefly only to mate. Males and sometimes females will actively seek a mate. Males perform elaborate mating behaviors to attract the attention of the female. Females will accept one or more males as mates during this time. In a few species, males and females mate for life, a period that may last 15 to 20 years. These life-long mates share one burrow. The females tend to the eggs, while the male hunts for himself and his mate.




Males and females mate belly to belly. Males deposit sperm directly into the female where it is stored in a special pouch just inside the opening of her reproductive organs. The eggs are fertilized inside her body just as they are being laid. The eggs may not be laid right away. The female may choose to wait until ocean currents are available for dispersing the eggs. Eggs are glued together in a mass and take anywhere from 10 days to two months to hatch. During this time the female carefully tends to the eggs and is guarded by the male. The hatchlings may leave the burrow immediately, or remain in the burrow for a week to two months.


The next topic: Anemone Clown Fishes~


Hope all of you enjoyed the read!

Thank you!


Lionel

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Mask Clearing - Tips and Tricks

Mask Clearing is one of most important skills when it comes to diving. However, there are some who have big trouble performing the mask clearing skill properly. 

It could be due to a fear of not being able to see anything underwater, or a case of cold water sensation on the face whereby the diver panics and forgets to breathe using only their mouth and inhales water through their nose. All these issues can be curbed with constant practice and calming one's nerves.

For this post, DiveRACE will be discussing some of the common problems about mask clearing and what to take note when doing the skill.


Some points and preparation

Coordination is important! Especially for nose and mouth breathing coordination.

Visualisation [whereby you close your eyes and mentally going through the things / steps that you are suppose to do - as though you are looking through your own eyes and not from a third party perspective] helps tremendously!

Put on your regulator and leave your mask aside and learn to breathe without your mask first! those first few breaths underwater without your mask will help you prepare when you have to remove and replace the mask underwater.


Half Mask Flood

Step 1: breathe in and out slowly to calm yourself first. 

Step 2: look downwards at a 45 degree angle and slightly open the top skirt of your mask. allow water to fill about half of your mask (around eye level) and seal back the mask skirt.

Step 3: concentrate on breathing in and out via your mouth. take in a breathe using your mouth and move to step 4 immediately [do not hold your breath]

Step 4: look upwards at a 45 degrees angle and slightly open the bottom skirt of your mask and breathe out via your nose at the same time.

*note: give a good and slow outward blow via your nose so as to clear the mask properly, instead of a fast and hard blow.
*note: if you require more than one breathe, do not panic. seal back the mask skirt and repeat step 3 and 4.

Step 5: Once the mask has been clear of water, replace and seal the bottom of the mask skirt.






Full Mask Flood

Step 1: breathe in and out slowly to calm yourself first. 

Step 2: Pull the mask away from your face so that the whole mask is filled with water.

*note: cold water / loss of ability to see may cause panic. Diver should prepare of the cold water on face sensation.

Step 3: concentrate on breathing in and out via your mouth. take in a breathe using your mouth and move to step 4 immediately [do not hold your breath]

Step 4: look upwards at a 45 degrees angle and slightly open the bottom skirt of your mask and breathe out via your nose at the same time.

*note: give a good and slow outward blow via your nose so as to clear the mask properly, instead of a fast and hard blow.
*note: if you require more than one breathe, do not panic. seal back the mask skirt and repeat step 3 and 4.

Step 5: Once the mask has been clear of water, replace and seal the bottom of the mask skirt.






Mask Removal and Replacement

Step 1: breathe in and out slowly to calm yourself first. 

Step 2: Remove the mask strap from the back of your head first, keeping the mask frame still in place. Once done, remove the mask from your face and hold it in your hand.

Step 3: Take a few breaths (using only your mouth!) and relax.

Step 4: Before replacing your mask, feel your mask and nose pocket to ensure that the mask is in a correct position. Put the mask strap in front of the mask frame (this is so that when you place the mask on your face, nothing is obstructing)

Step 5: Sweep your fringe away and place the mask frame back onto the face. Pull the mask strap to the back of your head.

*note: If fringe is caught in the mask, it will cause the mask to flood!
*note: ensure that the nose pocket is covering your nose properly. the nose should not be squashed!

Step 6: concentrate on breathing in and out via your mouth. take in a breathe using your mouth and move to step 4 immediately [do not hold your breath]

Step 7: look upwards at a 45 degrees angle and slightly open the bottom skirt of your mask and breathe out via your nose at the same time.

*note: give a good and slow outward blow via your nose so as to clear the mask properly, instead of a fast and hard blow.
*note: if you require more than one breathe, do not panic. seal back the mask skirt and repeat step 3 and 4.

Step 8: Once the mask has been clear of water, replace and seal the bottom of the mask skirt.


Common Mistakes

1. Opening bottom of mask skirt too wide - allowing more water to enter the mask

Remedy: Just need to open the mask skirt slightly, roughly one finger thickness would be sufficient.

2. Nose is outside of nose pocket, thus allowing air to escape and not forcing the water out

Remedy: Diver must take note of the position of the nose pocket / mask. Some tend to place the mask too high and thus do not cover the nose properly. Also, do not open the mask too wide.

3. Diver uses mouth to expel water in mask instead of the nose - this does not help as the air escapes in the open and not directly into the mask.

Remedy: Diver have to concentrate and practice breathing in via the mouth and out via the nose for a few times (10 times continuously before entering the water). They have to prepare and take in a hard breath via the mouth and breathe out hard via the nose. Using this exertive method, it helps the diver to control their muscles better.


Do remember that practice makes perfect! Keep practicing mask clearing whenever you get the chance and do not shun it. The more you practice, the easier it would become. Also, you can try mask clearing in different position and practice your buoyancy control too!

Everyone can refer to our website which links to a video, showing an instructor performing a mask clearing skill. (you can click on full / partial or remove in our website under Open Water Course, located at the bottom of the page)



Hope this read about mask clearing has been good and helpful!


Dive Safe!


Lionel

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

7 Skies Wreck


DiveRACE presents a description of 7 skies wreck, a bit of history and tips on how to dive the famous location.

Short Write Up

One of the world’s first real supertankers, the 98000 ton, 262 meter long 1965 Swedish-built Seven Skies is another classic Asian dive site. In 1969, she suffered an explosion and sank east of Tioman Island, not far from Anambas Islands (Indonesia). She rests perfectly upright in 64 meters of water and the entire superstructure is intact, but tanker section has collapsed. As you descend, you will find the top of the funnel at about 20 meters, the bridge and superstructure at 33 meters, and then various decks and structures to explore down to the main deck level at 45 meters.

Main attractions include the bridge, the pool, the explosion damage and many easy swim-through and penetrations. Visibility is usually very good up 15 meters and can be up to 30 meters. Almost the entire superstructure is accessible by recreational divers (Funnel and top deck) and the deeper parts inside and outside the hull there is plenty to explore for technical divers as well. Also, some divers (not advisable without experience) like to dive at the bow area too.

Divers should follow the structure closely in bad visibility and note where the attached stern line always is. Also, a safety tank is always hung at 5m so that divers can use if they are low on air and still need to do their safety stop.

Things to see there

Hundreds (maybe even a thousand) of spadefish / batfish and huge schools of rainbow runners are a standard sight at the location. If divers are lucky, they get to see eagle rays, manta rays and even whale sharks!

The batfishes are not shy at all and usually will follow divers closely and even within touching distance.




Do note that there are scorpion fishes around the structure, thus, please look properly before grabbing on to anything. In fact, the best is not to grab anything!

Best times to dive

Definitely April or October when the monsoon season is ending or approaching and the surface is flat and calm. This is also the period whereby there is a higher chance of sighting manta rays and whale sharks. Visibility is also at its best.




Other periods would be to dive during slack tide or high tide, whereby divers can avoid the ferocious currents that 7 skies has.

Dangers of 7 skies wrecks

Many a times, there are divers who would push the recreational diving limits and go pass their no-deco limit. Do note that DiveRACE do not support divers doing such a thing, especially when they are on single tank and are not prepared for emergencies.

We seriously advice divers to be sufficiently trained and experienced in deep diving as this dive site begins only at about 20m. This means short No-deco limits and, even if you are on nitrox, you are still limited by your depth limits.  Furthermore, as the dive site is in open water (no nearby islands to help shelter), the currents may at times be strong enough to sweep a diver far away.

Tips to avoid problems
  1.  Take note of your air consumption rate, especially when you are deeper. Check your SPG more often that you would.
  2. Avoid going to the maximum depth if possible as you give yourself some room for buffer.
  3. Have a dive computer and stick to the No-deco limits! What is the point of having a computer but not using it?
  4.  Use the stern line (attached from the boat to the structure) when there are strong currents
  5.  Do a proper safety stop or multiple safety stops at different levels. (eg. 15m / 1min, 10m / 2mins, 5m / 3mins)
  6.  Always check if you are ready for the dive and that you are feeling alright. If you are not, please do not push yourself as you can always dive another time.


DiveRACE will be heading to Anambas Islands / 7 skies wreck / Igara Wreck often as shown in our trip schedules.

Do check it out and book with us! Or send us an email to enquire about it!

Hope everyone enjoyed and appreciate the small read on 7 skies wreck!

Thank you!

Dive Safe,

Lionel

Saturday, February 13, 2010

Trip Report - 2nd to 6th Feb 2010 Similan Islands

DiveRACE first Trip Report from our Customer - Ms Chen Shuang Hui =)


Hello Everyone!

There were many firsts on this trip to Phuket. I took my first solo flight, had my first taste of liveaboard diving (and still savouring it), saw my first manta ray, and finally... got to dive for the very first time with Lionel, a friend I’ve known for almost 4 years. (Gasp! We took this long to make it happen?!) Much awaited really, and with the marvellous experience I’ve had, I know the second time will not be far from now. ;)

2nd Feb 2010

A 1.5 hour ride in the minivan brought us from Phuket to the Thap Lamu Pier, where MV DiveRACE was docked at. I stepped out of the minivan and took a good look at the crew and my 14 fellow divers. It was 8.15 p.m. on 2 Feb. Slightly groggy due to my ungodly 4.30 a.m. wakeup time that day, I glanced at the boat (while the crew was busy unloading our bags) and did not quite know what to expect. “Am I going to have a decent bed to sleep in tonight?” was a thought lingering around in my head. Fortunately, it turned out that my Standard Cabin was rather small but comfortable enough for 4 restful nights. The boat began to set sail and the start of our diving adventure was ceremoniously marked by the setting off of firecrackers at the bow. As they fizzed and crackled away, we were all hopeful that this ritual would indeed bring to us a smooth-sailing time at sea and much luck on our dives!

















3 Feb 2010

Waking up to the morning call (the crew sounded the honk every morning), everyone gathered at the dining area for some light bites before Marco gave us the very first dive briefing. I was all excited and raring to gear up and jump into the waters. I can now momentarily forget the agony of getting into my new wetsuit (14x) since the pain is over.

We were split into 3 groups – led by dive guides Marco, Brian and Tristan. There were an Italian couple (Vincenzo and Beatrice) and a British couple (Dan and Sophie) in my dive group. Lionel was of course in the same group as well – he had to fulfil the added responsibility of a friend on this trip. Haha. (Honestly speaking, I’m thankful that you looked out for me, my friend!)

Gearing up was an easy affair on the spacious dive deck; the crew was around to help with getting our BCDs on and even went an extra mile to help us put on our fins, each and every dive. How’s that for quality service? ;)

We did our checkout dive at Anita’s Reef, located at Island #5 of the Similan Islands. It was awesome to get my nitrogen fix once again. The marine galore (lionfish, longnose hawkfish, juvenile ribbon eels, spearing mantis shrimp, Kuhl’s stingray etc) coupled with the excellent visibility made for a promising start. Indeed the subsequent 3 dives for the rest of the day did not disappoint with the delightful sightings of the pink giant frogfish, octopus, hawksbill turtle and leopard shark. With the glorious February weather, warm companionship, and 5 scrumptious meals a day, I was truly enjoying the eat-sleep-dive routine - Just my kind of perfect holiday. J

4 Feb 2010 

Finally I’ve begun on my second dive logbook! I got the DiveRACE logbook which has a sleek handy size and cleverly planned page layout. And it was just so apt that my first sighting of a manta ray was recorded into this logbook. J

The elusive manta rays were sighted at Koh Bon on dive #7. My dive group was waiting patiently for the looming shadows to emerge. I was getting more anxious as we passed by another dive group which had spotted 2 manta rays and we had not seen any then! “Hurry, appear, damn it!” I rubbed my hands in anticipation and as if doing so was like magic working its charm, a manta ray soon appeared! It cruised through the waters gracefully flapping its wings. Ah... Those were some absolutely enthralling moments! And boy was I glad to have captured them in a video footage. (You can view the video on the DiveRACE Facebook page!)



After the dive, everyone eagerly shared with one another their manta ray stories. “We saw 3... 1 was quite a distance away but 2 came close by...” No, unfortunately that wasn’t the story I told. My dive group only saw 1!! I was a little sore about it but oh well; I guess I can’t be too greedy. At least we managed to see 1 up close right? ;)

Another highlight on 4 Feb was going to the Donald Duck Bay at Similan Island #8. Climbing up to the viewpoint of Sail Rock, what was presented before us was a picturesque image of inviting turquoise waters and white powdery sands just beneath our toes. With such a gorgeous backdrop, photo-taking opportunities were aplenty. I was glad to have taken one with Leo, a fellow Singaporean on this trip. J



5 Feb 2010

One of the best days of the trip! We did our first dive of the day at Koh Tachai and it was an extremely enjoyable one for me. Superb visibility, barely any currents and pleasant finds (leopard shark, twin-spotted dwarf lionfish, cleaner shrimp etc) every now and then; I was happy as a lark. Indulging in a yummy breakfast of cheese toasts, baked potatoes, bacon, ham, salad and omelettes, I logged dive #9 of the trip and at the same time, wondered if the remaining 5 dives were going to be just as awesome. 

The next 3 dives of the day were done at Richelieu Rock. Why 3 dives at the same site you may ask. It may just be one horseshoe-shaped rock but it boasts such great biodiversity and splendid colours, one is able to be rewarded with different spectacular finds on every single dive. We were overwhelmed by the alluring colours and the buzzing marine life; every minute was richly occupied. Harlequin shrimps, white-eyed moray eels, scorpion fish, cuttlefish, ornate ghost pipefish, chevron barracudas, trumpet fish amidst beautiful purple reefs, phew... the list goes on and on. You really have to be there to fully appreciate the kind of visual feast I was enjoying! 

A smashing way to conclude the day, we had a most tantalizing BBQ dinner painstakingly prepared by the crew. I remember walking past the kitchen several times earlier on that day and seeing them busy with different tasks, from washing the prawns, marinating the meats to skewering them together. I’m pretty much a carnivore so you can imagine how contented I was to be indulging in the delightful spread! Oh yes, thanks Leo for generously sharing his red wine as well! That absolutely complemented the dinner to the highest level. After having spent about 2 days together, the chattering and laughter on the boat were clearly more spontaneous than before.



















6 Feb 2010 

The last day of the trip and we did our last 2 dives at the Boon Sung Wreck. Brian said it was quieter than usual. A little disappointing but I guess we need some lows to appreciate the highs. J We saw many lionfish, honeycomb moray eels and small schools of barracudas. On the whole, it was still a pleasant last dive on the MV DiveRACE.

After we were done with packing and washing up, everyone gathered at the dining area for the final time. Thank you to the Thai crew for ensuring that our stomachs never grumbled for a moment with 5 satisfying meals a day! Thank you for making gearing up a less arduous affair! Lastly, thank you to the dive guides for finding the inconspicuous little gems for us! J I must say that I don’t have an eye for detail so I really, really appreciate that. Haha.

Upon reaching the Thap Lamu Pier, we had 2 group photos taken together. With those, I brought away some of the best diving memories I’ve ever had. They will last me for a long time to come, but it won’t be long before you see me on MV DiveRACE again. J  





















By:

Chen Shuang Hui
Customer on MV DiveRACE



For all other photos of the trip, pls view them at our DiveRACE website Gallery. Special Thanks to Ms Shuang Hui! =)

Upcoming Trips! Check them out at our Trip Booking System!

Last but not least, Wishing Everyone a Happy Lunar New Year! HUAT AH!


Lionel